Scope of Responsibility Changes the View

I’ve been teaching a lot of data visualization workshops lately. Inevitably, when I reach the part of the day when I ask participants how they gather requirements to build a monitoring dashboard, I always get the same rote, data-analyst-centric response: “I ask my customers what questions they want answered.”

My job (or cross to bear; you decide) is to then firmly nudge them toward a new approach, one that requires them to ask instead, “What is your role and scope of responsibility? As you work in that role, what decisions must you make to achieve your goals and objectives?”

Dashboards exist to help people visually monitor – at a glance – the data and information they need to achieve one or more goals and objectives quickly and easily. This is considerably different from analyzing data to answer a specific question or to uncover potentially interesting relationships in that data.

With this construct about the purpose of a dashboard in mind, let’s consider examples of two different prototype Emergency Department (ED) dashboards designed using the same source data. We’ll ask end users to describe their role (position) in the ED, the scope of their responsibility there, and what summary information they need in deciding how to meet their goals and objectives. We’ll call this the RSD [Role, Scope, Decisions] approach.

Example A: Emergency Department Operations Manager

Here, the ED Operations Manager’s role and scope of responsibility are to ensure that patients arriving at the ED receive timely and appropriate care, and that the ED doesn’t become overloaded, thereby causing unduly long patient wait times or diversion to another facility.

Given these parameters, the chronological frame for the dashboard below is present|real time, and is focused on where and for how long actual ED patients are in the queue to receive care.

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In the upper left-hand section of this dashboard is a summary ED Overload Score (70), overlaid on a scale of No to Extreme Overload. Under this summary are elements of the score: ED Triage (10 points), Seen by MD|Waiting for Specialty (10 points), Specialty Patients Waiting (20 points) and Waiting for In-Patient Bed (30 points). This summary provides a mechanism for the manager to monitor both the risk of overload and the key factors driving the score higher.

Additional information on the dashboard helps the Manager analyze (across census categories) the patient census, and see how many cubicles are currently in use vs. available for examination and treatment. Average wait times in minutes and by patient triage level in eight (8) categories such as Arrival to MD Evaluation (compared to a hospital goal), and ED Length of Stay (LOS) are displayed using bar graphs in the middle section. The lower left-hand display projects when additional cubicles will be available (blue signals available cubicles; orange, a shortage); the lower right-hand one shows information on patient wait times by sub-specialty.

All of this dashboard’s metrics are designed to help the ED Operations Manager identify active and potential bottlenecks, and to act to meet the objectives: delivering timely and appropriate care, and avoiding ED overload.

Example B: Emergency Department Executive Director

Here, the Executive Director’s role and scope of responsibility are to ensure that not only is the ED team providing timely and appropriate care, but that reimbursement is not forfeited because pay-for-performance (annual|contractual|third-party|value-based-purchasing) goals are missed.

In response to this role’s needs, display time frames include both Month to Date and Current and Previous YTD performance, allowing the Director to stack current performance against agreed-upon targets for metrics tied to third-party reimbursement, as well as potential opportunities for improvement.

Click to expand

At the top of the dashboard is a table of summary performance metrics (number of patients seen and treated; time in diversion due to ED Overload) for the current month vs. current and previous years, and change over time. The middle bar charts provide the Director with the current month and YTD performance compared to targets for the metrics often tied to third-party, value- based (pay-for-performance) reimbursement. The deviation graphs at the bottom of the dashboard provide context for monthly performance compared to targets trended over time.

In this dashboard, summary metrics help the ED Executive Director monitor overall performance, identify areas for improvement in delivering timely care and avoiding ED Overload, and ensure that reimbursement is not lost.

Shifting from asking your customers what questions they need to answer to asking them to describe scope, role, and decisions may seem like a distinction without a difference. It isn’t. Framing inquiries this way stimulates everyone to step back and examine what is required to support a universal, shared goal: acquiring the right information – at a glance – to work toward goals and objectives, and hit those targets, quickly, confidently, and well.

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